July 31, 2009

Gillibrand Announces Key Senate Panel Approves $150,000 To Help Steer Queens Youth Towards NYC's Waterways

Federal Dollars Will Give Public High School New Maritime Programs, Marine Technology

Washington, DC - U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand announced that late yesterday the Senate Appropriations Committee approved $150,000 for the Urban Assembly New York Harbor High School in the FY10 Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Appropriations Bill, which will be used to steer Queens students towards a maritime career using the latest marine technology and a rigorous maritime-based curriculum. Senator Gillibrand aggressively lobbied members of the Appropriations Committee to include funding for the project in this year's spending bill.

"During these tough economic times, we need to continue investing in environmental education to prepare our students for the new green economy," said Senator Gillibrand, a mother of two young sons. "We must continue to support programs that are creating the next generation of environmentalists by giving children a hands-on education that connects them with the environment."

Located in Bushwick, Brooklyn and home to more than 420 students, the Urban Assembly New York Harbor High School is designed to successfully prepare students towards a career path built upon New York City's maritime experience. The school's curriculum covers a broad range of sectors including Marine Technology, Commercial Diving, Coastal Piloting and Seamanship, Marine Engineering, and Scuba Diving and Fisheries Management. In 2010, the school will relocate to Governor's Island, located in the heart of New York's harbor.

New York Harbor High School will use the $150,000 federal investment to improve its comprehensive curriculum through technology upgrades and its internship program which pairs students with professionals in their chosen field.

Late yesterday, the Appropriations Bill for Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education passed the full committee. The legislation will now head to the floor for a vote before the full Senate.  The bill will then proceed to the House-Senate Conference Committee, before final passage in both chambers, and sent to the President to become law.